Click here for some authors we’ve talked to about their books and their process.

And click below for some recommendations from some authors we trust.

 

Patrick Jones

is the undisputed Light Heavyweight Champion of All-Things-Wrestling-In-The-Library.  This is his Book / Fight Club List: Ten best for teen boys about things in the ring.

  • Becoming the Natural, My Life In and Out of the Cage
  • There are many UFC biographies out, so it's who you like. I'm an old guy; I like the old guy.

  • Headlock
  • A novel about a teen breaking into wrestling while wrestling with some problems of his own. The author is a Ric Flair fan (whooo!).

  • Lion’s Tale, Around the World in Spandex
  • There's a lot of wrestling biographies out there, but Y2J's is probably best of the newer ones probably because he takes himself the least serious of all the squared circle scribes.

  • Mondo Lucha A Go-Go, The Bizarre and Honorable World of Wild Mexican Wrestling
  • Filled with photos of these masked Mexican wrestlers, this is a must to understand the history and scope of pro wrestling.

  • Octagon
  • Nothing but photos of UFC fighters through all stages of their careers. From the founders like Ken Shamrock to the modern kings of eight-sided cage, a wonderful way to browse the history of UFC.

  • Title Shot, Into the Shark Tank of Mixed Martial Arts
  • The book follows the author's journey to become a MMA fighter. He thought training for the Army was hard work. Welcome to the cage.

  • Warrior Angel
  • The 4th novel of a series that started in the 1960s still punches hard with hard punches and harder choices.

  • Whole Sky Full of Stars
  • A quick little read about a young man trying to earn money, and respect, by winning a boxing tournament.

  • Why I Fight, A Novel
  • The gritty covers lets you know the story inside is a tough one about a young man searching for himself, one fight at a time.

  • WWE Encyclopedia
  • You get photos, lists, more photos, and more lists. As JR would say, "Business is about to pick up."

Jeffrey Brown

Jeffrey Brown lives in Chicago with his wife and two sons. As a kid, he loved comics and dreamed of making them. With a long line of publications and art shows behind and in front of him, we'd say he's certainly living that dream. He's definitely a case of if you can dream it, with a lot of hard work, you can do it. Most lately he's the author of the New York Times bestselling Jedi Academy series. 

photo credit: Jill Liebhaber

  • The Complete Tales Of Winnie-The-Pooh
  • A.A. Milne
  • Illustrated by Ernest H. Shepard
    I only knew the Disney version of Winnie-The-Pooh until I had a son, and discovered I'd really been missing out. I was familiar with Shepard's excellent drawings, but had no idea just how funny and smart the original Pooh stories are.

  • Anything by Roald Dahl
  • Roald Dahl
  • There have been some notable Dahl adaptations - the original Willy Wonka film, Wes Anderson's Fantastic Mr. Fox - but Dahl's books are more than just great source material for movies. They're endlessly entertaining, often laugh-out-loud funny, and great to read at any age, alone or with someone else also of any age.

  • Labyrinth
  • A.C.H. Smith
  • Going in reverse, here's a novelization of film I loved, and read a ton all the way to my teenage years. Recently reprinted in a nice edition that includes some of Brian Froud's goblin sketches, it's a fairy tale informed by the imagination of Jim Henson and the humor of Monty Python's Terry Jones.

  • His Dark Materials Trilogy
  • Philip Pullman
  • Fans of Harry Potter, C.S. Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien should be sure to check out this fantasy series. The tone is earnest and sincere, and the adventure is full of wonder and mystery.

Tony DiTerlizzi

is the illustrator of The Spiiderwick Chronicles, The Spider and the Fly, Ted, and many more.  He uses his powers for good.

  • Peter Pan and Wendy
  • J.M. Barrie's classic has surly pirates, bloodthirsty native Americans, a hungry crocodile, feisty faeries and flying kids with weapons . . . what more could you ask for?

  • Watership Down
  • Richard Adams takes you on an incredible quest from a home colony that’s completely eradicated to Shangri la. One the way, there are monsters, villains, allies, oh, and a fascist leader trying to seize the hero's new home . . . and its all told with rabbits. You read that right — rabbits.

  • The Mouse and the Motorcycle
  • Mouse buddy + toy motorcycle = Awesome!

  • The Lorax
  • In my mind, this one of Dr. Seuss’s undisputed classics. Sadly, we need the Lorax now more than ever.

  • Lafcadio: The Lion That Shot Back
  • One of Shel Silverstein's lesser known titles, but one of my all-time favorites. Actually, I learned about this one when my younger brother read it for school and had me help with his book report. It is one of those stories that you will always remember.

Peter Brown

is an illustrator and a writer.  Probably best know for his books about a dog named Chowder.  But he’s working on plenty of new books right now.

  • I can't overemphasize how perfectly James Marshall balances sweetness and absurdity in these stories.

  • Everyone Poops
  • Everyone Poops is a continuous source of 'inspiration.

  • James and the Giant Peach
  • Witty dialogue, fantastical adventure and a wonderfully dark sense of humor seem to effortlessly flow from Roald Dahl's pen.

  • This series is perhaps the most unique, thoughtful, and provocative fantasy I’ve ever read.

  • 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
  • I was mesmerized by the way Verne describes the science and logic of the world in which this story takes place.

Eliot Schrefer

Eliot Schrefer is a primate who writes novels about apes.

Eliot Schrefer

  • Homeland
  • R.A. Salvatore
  • "The first fifty pages of the Dark Elf Trilogy have enough swordplay and plot twists to make you gasp."

  • The Tin Woodman of Oz
  • L. Frank Baum
  • "All the Oz books, actually. But I liked the Tin Woodsman the most, so this is the book I'm listing. Let's not psychoanalyze."

  • The Belgariad
  • David Eddings
  • Also, The Mallorean. "When I was the new kid in school, the characters in these books were my buds. Funny, courageous, and there's 1000 pages worth of them."

  • The Princess Bride
  • William Goldman
  • "Funny and clever and full of heart."

  • Dragonlance: Chronicles and Legends
  • by Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman. "I started with the computer game and then turned to the books. Lots of gods and glowy magic and giant spiders rearing in pain! Awesome."